#FaxBigBrother to bury Senate under mountains of paper and stop CISA cyber spying bill

#FaxBigBrother to bury Senate under mountains of paper and stop CISA cyber spying bill

What is the answer when many of the people representing Americans are technically illiterate and continue to think poor legislation like CISA is the answer to cyber woes? According to tech savvy groups, the answer is to bury those Senators under a mountain of faxes as part of Operation FaxBigBrother and a “week of action” to help stop cyber spying and the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA).

Fight for the Future

“Cybersecurity experts agree that CISA won’t stop cyberattacks like the OPM hacks, but Congress is stuck in 1984 and clearly doesn’t understand modern technology,” said Fight for the Future campaign director Evan Greer. “They’ve received millions of emails and phone calls from concerned citizens opposing bills like CISA that grant companies sweeping legal immunity to share our private data with the government; maybe using technology as outdated as their thinking will help them finally get the message.”

Eight different phone lines convert emails and hashtagged tweets to faxes; each fax is sent to all 100 members of the Senate. Within a day of launching Operation FaxBigBrother “more than 310,000 faxes” were “queued up to flood fax machines on Capitol Hill.”

Fight for the Future claims that CISA will not only “massively violate privacy,” but also give the NSA “the information they need to finally crank up their cybersecurity surveillance system.” The EFF explained, “Not only does CISA grant companies more power to obtain ‘cyber threat indicators’ and to disclose that data to the government without a warrant—it requires real time sharing of that information to military and intelligence agencies, including the NSA. In other words, cyber threat indicators shared with any agency would be automatically shared with the NSA—all without requiring companies to strip out personally identifying information.”

Although the OPM hack and almost every attack that happens it due to incompetence—such as using “password” as a password or other PEBKAC and ID10T errors—it will give companies immunity and the thumbs up to share your information with the government. FaxBigBrother added logos so you can visualize who will get your information.

Fight for the Future

“CISA is a mass surveillance bill dressed up as a cybersecurity bill,” added Fight for the Future CTO Jeff Lyon, “It’s a blatant end-run around the Constitution and essentially legalizes all forms of government and corporate spying, putting giant companies like Facebook and Google above the law and allowing them to do almost anything they want with our personal information.”

Access

CISA would give companies “new and invasive tools” for monitoring “broadly-defined threats” and allow those companies “to recklessly deploy countermeasures that damage networks belonging to innocent bystanders.” The EFF said “cybersecurity purposes” and “cybersecurity threat” have “overbroad definitions” in CISA yet “would create incredibly broad immunity for companies that engage in any of the activities authorized by the bill.” It will be too bad, so sad if you want to know what data is collected about you or about everyone as CISA is exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests.

Access

CISA is “fundamentally flawed” and may end up making things “worse for Internet users.” A coalition of 68 experts asked President Obama to “pledge to veto CISA” as it “threatens privacy and civil liberties and may even undermine Internet security.” The letter was signed by 39 civil society organizations and companies, including the EFF, CDT, ACLU, Access, Free Press, The Constitution Project, The Sunlight Foundation, Fight for the Future and more, as well as by 29 security experts like car hacker Charlie Miller, crypto guru Bruce Schneier, Tor Project researcher Jacob Appelbaum, and Joe Grand who was formerly known as Kingpin in the L0pht hacker group and who also later co-hosted Discovery Channel’s Prototype This!

“CISA fails to protect users’ personal information,” the group wrote. “It allows vast amounts of personal data to be shared with the government, even that which is not necessary to identify or respond to a cybersecurity threat.”

The letter concluded that CISA “threatens to undermine privacy and civil liberties, and increase cybersurveillance,” and then urged President Obama to oppose CISA and “defend privacy and civil liberties by voicing your opposition and your intention to veto it.”

The EFF believes that just like the original version of CISA, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), “grassroots activism can stop this legislation in its tracks.” Suggested ways you can help during this week of action include visiting Stop Cyber Spying where you can email and fax your Senators to tell them to vote no on CISA and faxing your lawmakers and then tweeting about “why CISA must be stopped with the hashtag #StopCISA. Use the hashtag #FaxBigBrother if you want to automatically send a fax to your Senator opposing CISA.”

Senator Ron Wyden, who has been opposing CISA, was happy to hear that the vote on the “badly flawed” bill may be delayed until after the Senate break in September. “I really want to commend the advocates for the tremendous grassroots effort to highlight the fact that this bill was badly flawed from a privacy standpoint,” Wyden told The Hill. “Our side has picked up an enormous amount of support.” But don’t stop as “finding 40 votes to block the bill completely will be a difficult task.”

This article was written by Darlene Storm from Computerworld and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Police may no longer respond to all burglaries, warns chief

Police may no longer respond to all burglaries, warns chief

Government cuts to the policing budget are forcing the service to make big changes to the way it works

Burglary victims should not expect an automatic visit from the police, a top police chief has warned, as forces seek to find new ways to absorb the government’s cuts to police budgets.

Sara Thornton, who chairs the National Police Chiefs’ Council, has said that “real changes” to policing are needed if the service is going to continue providing a service to the public while protecting its shrinking number of officers and staff from stress.

Thornton told the BBC that the focus should be on protecting the public from harm and dealing with the growing number of complex crimes, including sexual abuse, terrorism and cyber-crime.

This might mean that officers no longer visit a burglary victim if the perpetrator has fled and there are other ways of investigating the crime, she said.

“If we’re really serious about putting a lot of effort into protecting children, for example, it might mean if you’ve had a burglary, for example, and the burglar has fled, we won’t get there as quickly as we have in the past,” she added. “Of course, we will still want to gather evidence, but we might do it in different ways.”

Thornton, the former chief constable of Thames Valley Police – which covers the constituencies of Prime Minister David Cameron and Home Secretary Theresa May – said government funding for police in England and Wales had been cut by about 25 per cent in real terms over the last five years, with more cuts to come.

The latest Home Office statistics show that nearly 17,000 police officer posts have been lost since March 2010 – the equivalent of losing all of the officers currently policing Wales and Yorkshire.

Thornton’s comments come as a separate BBC Radio 5 live investigation found that some police forces are using overtime to cover gaps caused by staff shortages. The overtime bill for officers and staff in England and Wales totalled almost £1bn over three years and increased by £6m last year.

The Home Office said it has asked the police pay body to see if more could be done to reduce the overall overtime bill.

More on Police may no longer respond to all burglaries, warns chief

This article was from The Week and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

MetalCaptcha: Free service uses metal band logos as CAPTCHAs

MetalCaptcha: Free service uses metal band logos as CAPTCHAs

Hacker News had me laughing today as a company called HeavyGifts took a joke and turned it into a real and free product by using metal band logos as CAPTCHAs. Unless there is another computer virus based on weaponizing heavy metal, such as the malware reported to F-Secure’s Mikko Hypponen by an Iranian nuclear scientist after AC/DC’s Thunderstruck was allegedly blasting from workstations in the middle of the night, when else can I write about metal music?

MetalCaptcha asks, “Are you a metal head or a bot?”

Everyone has encountered captchas. They are ugly and unreadable. You spend 2-3 minutes trying to figure out the overly distorted characters. But here is a long awaited solution!

The examples captured below are easy, but not all of them are…and that’s coming from someone who really likes and is familiar with many flavors of metal music.

HeavyGifts

The goal of MetalCaptcha is to “banish the evil bots from the website forms.” There’s code that can be embedded to use the free service and supposedly a WordPress plugin in the works.

You can try MetalCaptcha out, but the site is struggling under the surge of traffic coming from Hacker News and possibly other sites as well. How well would you do if you were presented with these metal band logos as CAPTCHAs?

HeavyGifts

If that seemed tough, then you might like commenter ajanuary’s suggestion, “In Chrome right click the CAPTCHA image, click ‘Search Google for this image,’ copy and paste the resulting text search back as the results.” In other words, the CAPTCHA can be defeated by an image search algorithm; metal logo CAPTCHAs might be easier for a bot than a person.

HeavyGifts

If you get the metal logo right, then you are “rewarded” with “smart boy” or “very good.” If you mess up, there are a variety of messages, such as “lame.”

Whether using metal band logos as CAPTCHAs is meant purely for fun or as a genuine replacement of unreadable and aggravating CAPTCHAs, the company said it is taking comments on how to develop the service.

HeavyGifts

If you can’t make out the logos or hate metal music, then you might enjoy another Hacker News suggestion to visit Metal Sucks, where figuring out the “completely unreadable band logo” of the week can win you some swag or other prizes.

Is anybody ready to deploy MetalCaptcha and see if people or bots do best at figuring out metal band logos? Maybe Ticketmaster could at least give it a try?

This article was written by Ms. Smith from NetworkWorld and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

How To Hack A Brinks Armored Truck

How To Hack A Brinks Armored Truck

Brinks truck hacking

A pair of cybersecurity researchers said they plan to bring a Brink’s armored vehicle on stage and hack into its vault at an upcoming security conference. All it takes to break into the trucks, which are driven by armed guards, is to exploit a weakness in a USB located on the outside of the trucks’ safe.

Oscar Salazar and Dan Petro, security associates at Bishop Fox, told eweek.com they’ve created a tool capable of manipulating CompuSafe Galileo, the Brink’s cash management system intended for use at corporate retailers. When employees insert cash into the CompuSafe machine, it automatically counts the money and generates a report for the store. CompuSafe then prevents the safe from being opened again unless both a store manager and Brinks security employee verify their presence on a touch screen.

But there’s no additional key or any kind of access restriction to provide another layer of physical security on the USB port, said Salazar and Petro. They plan to present their findings in Las Vegas on August 8, at the DefCon 23 conference.

“One of the main vulnerabilities we are focusing on comes by way of a USB port that is on the exterior of the safe,” Salazer told eWeek. “We have created a little tool that we can just plug into the safe, wait 60 seconds for the tool to do its work, and then the safe doors will open and you can take all the cash out.”

Over 14,000 CompuSafe Galileo machines are in use across the U.S., PC World reported, and all appear to be made vulnerable by this hack. The USB design flaws also enabled the researchers to plug a functioning mouse and keyboard into the machine.

“Nothing good comes from that,” Salazer told PC World. “Every step of the way, we were like, ‘This can’t be possible,” Petro added.

This article was written by Jeff Stone from International Business Times and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Disease detection via your smartphone is in the works.

Android flaw lets hackers break in with a text message

Cyber security firm Zimperium on Monday warned of a flaw in the world’s most popular smartphone operating system that lets hackers take control with a text message.

“Attackers only need your mobile number, using which they can remotely execute code via a specially crafted media file delivered via MMS (text message),” Zimperium Mobile Security said in a blog post.

“A fully weaponized successful attack could even delete the message before you see it. You will only see the notification.”

Android code dubbed “Stagefright” was at the heart of the problem, according to Zimperium.

Stagefright automatically pre-loads video snippets attached to text messages to spare recipients from the annoyance of waiting to view clips.

Hackers can hide malicious code in video files and it will be unleashed even if the smartphone user never opens it or reads the message, according to research by Zimperium’s Joshua Drake.

“The targets for this kind of attack can be anyone,” the cyber security firm said, referring to Stagefright as the worst Android flaw discovered to date.

“These vulnerabilities are extremely dangerous because they do not require that the victim take any action to be exploited.”

Malicious code executed by hackers could take control of smartphones and plunder contents without owners knowing.

Stagefright imperils some 95 percent, or an estimated 950 million, of Android phones, according to the security firm.

Zimperium said that it reported the problem to Google and provided the California Internet firm with patches to prevent breaches.

“Google acted promptly and applied the patches to internal code branches within 48 hours, but unfortunately that’s only the beginning of what will be a very lengthy process of update deployment,” Zimperium said.

It did not appear as though hackers had taken advantage of the Stagefright vulnerability, according to Zimperium.

Updating Android software powering mobile devices is controlled by hardware makers and sometimes telecommunication service carriers, not Google.

While Apple controls the hardware and software in iPhones, iPads, and iPods powered by its mobile operating system, Google makes Android available free to device makers who customize the code and update it as they see fit.

More about Drake’s research was to be disclosed at a Black Hat computer security conference taking place in Las Vegas early in August.

This article was from AFP Relax News and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Cyber security firm Zimperium has warned of a flaw in the world's most popular smartphone Android operating system that lets hackers take control with a text message

Android flaw lets hackers break in with a text message

Cyber security firm Zimperium has warned of a flaw in the world’s most popular smartphone Android operating system that lets hackers take control with a text message.

“Attackers only need your mobile number, using which they can remotely execute code via a specially crafted media file delivered via MMS (text message),” Zimperium Mobile Security said in a blog post.

“A fully weaponized successful attack could even delete the message before you see it. You will only see the notification.”

Android code dubbed “Stagefright” was at the heart of the problem, according to Zimperium.

Stagefright automatically pre-loads video snippets attached to text messages to spare recipients from the annoyance of waiting to view clips.

Hackers can hide malicious code in video files and it will be unleashed even if the smartphone user never opens it or reads the message, according to research by Zimperium’s Joshua Drake.

“The targets for this kind of attack can be anyone,” the cyber security firm said, referring to Stagefright as the worst Android flaw discovered to date.

“These vulnerabilities are extremely dangerous because they do not require that the victim take any action to be exploited.”

Malicious code executed by hackers could take control of smartphones and plunder contents without owners knowing.

Stagefright imperils some 95 percent, or an estimated 950 million, of Android phones, according to the security firm.

Zimperium said that it reported the problem to Google and provided the California Internet firm with patches to prevent breaches.

“Google acted promptly and applied the patches to internal code branches within 48 hours, but unfortunately that’s only the beginning of what will be a very lengthy process of update deployment,” Zimperium said.

It did not appear as though hackers had taken advantage of the Stagefright vulnerability, according to Zimperium.

Updating Android software powering mobile devices is controlled by hardware makers and sometimes telecommunication service carriers, not Google.

While Apple controls the hardware and software in iPhones, iPads, and iPods powered by its mobile operating system, Google makes Android available free to device makers who customize the code and update it as they see fit.

More about Drake’s research was to be disclosed at a Black Hat computer security conference taking place in Las Vegas early in August.

This article was from Agence France Presse and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Just the fax: internet activists go analog to fight Congress on cybersecurity bill

Just the fax: internet activists go analog to fight Congress on cybersecurity bill

Internet activists determined to halt what they see as another ill-conceived Washington cybersecurity bill are hitting Congress where it hurts: right in the fax machine.

Protesters have programmed eight separate phone lines to convert emails sent from a handy box at FaxBigBrother.com (as well as tweets with the hashtag #faxbigbrother) to individual faxes and send them to all 100 members of the US Senate.

The rationale, said Evan Greer of activist group Fight for the Future, is that Congress doesn’t appear to understand technology invented in the current century.

Related: A government surveillance bill by any other name is just as dangerous | Trevor Timm

“Groups like Fight for the Future have sent millions of emails, and they still don’t seem to get it,” said Greer. “Maybe they don’t get it because they’re stuck in 1984, and we figured we’d use some 80s technology to try to get our point across.” All 100 members of Congress will receive each of the faxes.

The deluge of badly printed screenshots is in protest of the the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), sponsored by California Democrat Dianne Feinstein, which proposes cooperation between government agencies and private tech companies and gives the latter broad latitude to collect as much data as possible from users in the name of cybersecurity and then share it with specific federal agencies, who in turn have latitude to share it with all federal agencies.

Findings shared by companies who work with the government will be specifically exempt from the Freedom of Information Act (Foia) and all other attempts by the public to learn exactly what pieces of their data are being collected, scaled and leafed through. Fans of the bill include Facebook, Google, AT&T, Comcast, Bank of America and Blue Cross Blue Shield.

The bill, stalled last year, has been recently resuscitated and will likely be considered next week before Congress adjourns for the summer on 7 August.

Do US senators really use their fax machines that often, though? “Yes, sadly,” one former Senate staffer told the Guardian. They love their pagers as well. Faxes “all get digitized by the time they get to the office, though”, which bodes ill for senatorial email inboxes.

And why is 1979’s hottest tech trend still so popular on Capitol Hill? “One thing that makes faxes – and pagers, for that matter – still good tech is that they are analog and difficult to search. Members love them, especially to transmit data for things like campaign financing records.”

It is, in other words, a great way for American elected officials to obey the letter of the law when it comes to campaign disclosures and Foia requests without exposing themselves to the kinds of invasive data-crunching to which the general public will be prey, should CISA pass. “No one wants to read” the transmissions, the ex-staffer said. “Readers get lost in them, but there is still a record of info being sent and received.”

But there’s still pressure on Congress to act on cybersecurity worries, especially after the recent hack of the Office of Personnel Management (to say nothing of the security problems at Target, Sony and a dozen other high-profile companies).

Matt Comyns, global cybersecurity practice leader with tech security firm Russell Reynolds, said there were great risks from simply letting the current arc of cybercrime take its course. “We are living in a new world and need to adjust our thinking and behavior,” he said. “The obvious risk to CISA and more regulation from the government is the abuse of privacy. However, the government seems to have decided that is the potential cost of creating a more secure environment for companies and US citizens.”

Greer had a different take. “With all these breaches,” she said, “there’s a lot of fearmongering going on in DC. They just say: ‘This is a problem – we’ve got to do something!’ And this is the something they’re going to do. It’s not just that this won’t fix things – it’ll make them worse. And it’ll give sweeping legal immunity to some of the largest companies in the world and open us all up to new forms of surveillance.”

This article originally appeared on guardian.co.uk

This article was written by Sam Thielman in New York from The Guardian and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Seven things security experts do to keep safe online

Seven things security experts do to keep safe online

Cybersecurity experts aren’t like you or I, and now we have the evidence to prove it. Researchers at Google interviewed more than 200 experts to find out what security practices they actually carry out online, and then spoke to almost 300 non-experts to find out how they differ.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the security experts practice what they preach – or, at least, they tell Google they do. They’re more likely to use two-factor authentication, to install software updates, and avoid visiting shady websites. Even for practices that are subject to healthy debate within the security community, actions speak louder than words: the experts are more likely to run anti-virus software and to use password managers than non-experts.

So what do the experts do? And, perhaps more importantly, what are the modern-day superstitions we can all stop doing to save time?

1) Yes, you do want to install updates

“Update all the software and firmware to fix any possible vulnerability.” “Patch, patch, patch.” The experts are clear: never turn down a security update. The researchers found that not only was installing updates the most commonly cited practice that experts do to keep safe online, it was also the largest difference between experts and non-experts: 35% of the former mentioned it, while only 2% of the latter. And a further 2% of experts also mentioned turning on automatic updates as one of the top three things they do, something no non-expert mentioned.

Non-experts, however, were worried that the updates could themselves lead to an infection: “Automatic software updates are not safe in my opinion, since it can be abused to update malicious content,” said one. And they were also worried that the updates would lead to new problems, with one saying that “there are often bugs in these updates initially”.

Software updates are usually the only way to combat actual security vulnerabilities – those bugs in software that let malicious attackers do things they shouldn’t. For instance, the recent Adobe flash vulnerabilities opened a user’s computer up to hacking if they continued using the software: until patches were issued, there was little option but to simply stop using Flash to stay safe online.

2) Use antivirus software – but don’t bank on it

Antivirus packages have a bad rap. For years, the software had a reputation for slowing down computers with added cruft, foisting pricy support packages on desperate users, and not really doing much to actually protect the computers in the first place. But despite all that, a majority of experts said they use the software.

However, antivirus software was vastly more favoured by non-experts than experts, and barely 60% of the experts actually used it. Users in the know said that “AV is simple to use, but less effective than installing updates,” and that the software “is good at detecting everyday/common malware. But nothing that’s slightly sophisticated”. In contrast, 70% of non-experts thought the advice to use AV software was likely to be “very effective”, and more than 80% of them had it installed.

So, while you shouldn’t uninstall your AV software, don’t get lulled into a false sense of security about it. Oh, and like everything else, always install the updates.

3) Keep your passwords unique

Password security online is frequently summed up as “strong, unique passwords” – but it turns out one part of that might be more important than the other. Non-experts tend to focus on the strong part, with 30% of them picking that as one of their top three tips against 18% of the experts; conversely, 25% of the experts pick “unique”, against 15% of the normal users.

It’s easy to see why. Using a strong password (that is, one that uses a good mixture of case, letters, numbers and symbols, as well as steering clear of dictionary words) requires a one-off feat of memory, and can feel very much like the sort of security procedure one should carry out, while avoiding password reuse is an ongoing hassle, requiring a new password for every site.

But in practice, most people are unlikely to face a brute-force attempt to break into their account by simply guessing their password, and even if they do, it doesn’t take much to render such an attack unsuccessful. But most people are likely to be the user of at least one service which gets hacked, as Adobe, Playstation and Ashley Madison users have all learned to their disadvantage. Having a unique password can prevent that misfortune compounding.

4) Use a password manager

How do you remember all those unique passwords? Password managers, such as 1Password, Lastpass and Keepass solve that problem. They are used by more than three times as many experts than non-experts, and experts are four times more likely to name them as one of the most important things they do online. The researchers cite one expert as saying that “’password managers change the whole calculus, because they make it possible to have both strong and unique passwords”.

Yet only 18% of non-experts thought the advice to use a password manager was “very effective”, and some even explicitly said they don’t trust them. Their reasoning is that password managers can be hacked, and that if other software has bugs and flaws, who can guarantee the same problems won’t apply to managers? In those worries, the users are backed-up by a team from Microsoft, who reported in 2014 that users should rely on easily-memorised passwords rather than managers.

But the security experts are clear: despite their concerns, using password managers is better than not. In fact, some of them even recommend writing the most valuable passwords down on paper. As one says, “malware can’t read a piece of paper”. But the number of experts actually writing down passwords was still lower than the number of non-experts.

As a rule of thumb, if you can remember all your passwords, you’re doing it wrong. Over half the non-experts claimed to remember every password, while just 17% of the experts said the same.

5) Use two-factor authentication

Perhaps because of companies such as Google or Twitter being increasingly pushy about trying to encourage users to switch to two-factor authentication (2FA) – where a password is backed up by a code linked to a specific mobile phone – almost two-thirds of non-experts say they use the security system on their accounts. Those rates still lag behind the experts, but the high numbers suggest that the message is getting through.

At the same time, the non-experts over-state the benefit of 2FA, especially when compared to the less flashy practice of using a password manager. More than four in five non-experts said they thought it was effective, compared to just 32% for password managers.

6) Visit secure websites, even if you don’t recognise them

Non-experts tend to claim that they keep safe by only visiting websites they already know about: “Visiting websites you’ve heard of doesn’t mean they are completely safe, but there is a higher chance of this,” explains one. But they might be exaggerating slightly: while 21% of non-experts said that not visiting unknown websites was an important safety practice, only 7% of them claimed to never visit unknown websites.

Even though 32% of experts said they “rarely” visit unknown websites, the more important piece of advice – and the one where the experts differed from the non-experts – was to check for HTTPS, the secure connection protocol, when visiting an untrusted website. In fact, it was the third most mentioned security practice amongst experts.

7) Do as I say, not as I do

But not everything security experts do is something to be followed. Despite recommending that users not click links on emails from unknown sources – a way to avoid phishing emails as well as targeted malware – the researchers themselves admit to doing so. “I do all the time,” one said, laughing, “but I tell my mother not to.” Another admitted that the advice is given more for simplicity’s sake than because it’s the best thing to do: “I never really found a way of giving more precise advice for people who are not technical on what is really safe and what is not.”

This article originally appeared on guardian.co.uk

This article was written by Alex Hern from The Guardian and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Fiat Chrysler Recalls 1.4M Vehicles After Jeep Hack Goes Viral

Fiat Chrysler Recalls 1.4M Vehicles After Jeep Hack Goes Viral

chrysler-uconnect

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is recalling 1.4 million Dodges, Jeeps, Rams and Chryslers after discovering that a software flaw in the cars’ radios makes them vulnerable to hackers. The announcement coincides with increasing scrutiny over the lack of cybersecurity in many of the most popular Internet of Things products.

Owners do not need to turn their vehicle into a dealer as part of the recall. Instead, FCA plans to send them a USB drive that, upon being plugged into the car, will update their security system, according to CNBC.

“The security of FCA US customers is a top priority, as is retaining their confidence in the Company’s products,” Fiat Chrysler said in a statement Friday. “Accordingly, FCA US has established a dedicated System Quality Engineering team focused on identifying and implementing best practices for software development and integration.”

The company said it’s not aware of any injuries that have occurred as a result of what it called “the software exploitation.”

This change comes only days after Wired magazine published a video of one of their journalists driving a Jeep as it was hacked on the highway. The security researchers who hacked the vehicle were able to turn on the moving vehicle’s windshield wipers, take control of the volume settings and ultimately steer the Jeep into a ditch.

The following vehicles are subject to the recall: 

2013-2015 MY Dodge Viper specialty vehicles
2013-2015 Ram 1500, 2500 and 3500 pickups
2013-2015 Ram 3500, 4500, 5500 Chassis Cabs
2014-2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee and Cherokee SUVs
2014-2015 Dodge Durango SUVs
2015 MY Chrysler 200, Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger sedans
2015 Dodge Challenger sports coupes

This article was written by Jeff Stone from International Business Times and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

US Secretary of State Kerry appears before Senate Foreign Relations Committee in Washington

Israeli action against Iran would be ‘huge mistake’ – Kerry: NBC

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Friday it would be a huge mistake if Israel decided to take unilateral military action against Iran over its nuclear programme in the future.

Kerry was asked in an NBC “Today” show interview if the nuclear deal reached last week between would make it more likely that Israel might attempt a military or cyber attack on Tehran.

“That’d be an enormous mistake, a huge mistake with grave consequences for Israel and for the region, and I don’t think it’s necessary,” Kerry said.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu and Susan Heavey)

This article was from Reuters and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.